Book: Creativity, Inc.

Problem-solving at its best. The problem at hand is how to build a sustainable creative culture:

What had drawn me to science, all those years ago, was the search for understanding. Human interaction is far more complex than relativity or string theory, of course, but that only made it more interesting and important; it constantly challenged my presumptions.

The book follows the path of Pixar, Inc. Along the way Ed Catmull (one of its founders) both reveals the core of what’s needed for few hundred people to work together to build a great product and shares a lot of tactics that either did or not work for Pixar itself.

If you work or play with groups of people of two or more, I would recommend you have a look at Creativity, Inc.

P.S. You might also want to check out Dave Martin’s 36 Things You Might Take Away From “Creativity, Inc.”

A Distributed Company Meetup

Toni, Automattic’s CEO explains how to make an awesome distributed company meetup.

Toni.org

I just got back from an exhilarating, week long Automattic company meetup in San Diego. We’ve now done 9 full company meetups over the last 6 years (plus dozens of smaller team ones), and I wanted to write down some tips on how to run a company meetup while it’s fresh in my mind:

1. Focus on connecting people: We call our get-togethers meetups – instead of off-sites or retreats – because our primary goal is to get everyone on the team to meet and to get to know each other better (not to get away or retreat from our office). We’re distributed (mostly working from home), so in-person meetups are especially important for us, but I think it would be beneficial to any company to get everyone together once or twice a year to spend time with each other to deepen personal connections and get to know the “people…

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